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Making Disciples the Hi-Tech Way PDF Print E-mail
Written by Calvin Fox   
Sunday, 10 May 2009 16:17

One of the major issues with Emergent Church folks is their concern to get rid of effects of Enlightenment on the church.  We must simply follow Jesus and be the church as it as in the first century.   Nothing complicated about that. The church has suffocated under the academic elite.  Away with the ecclesiastical intelligentsia and professional seminary training with all its jargon and  special techniques for ministry and technological trappings.  It is all about love and personal relationships.  The Church should be an egalitarian community of "laypeople".  An advocate of all that, a Seminary Professor, explains how he goes about training leaders of the church for today. 

"I am thinking [he writes] about transforming one of my fall classes more fully into Web 2.0. I began tinkering with my Church in Mission course (with help) -- it is a course I teach once a year to 60 MA students at Fuller Seminary. After talking with friends, I decided to create a couple of new things in the course this year, both in terms of web platform and content.

Web Platform:
Instead of a blog for the home page, students will access the class on a wetpaint wiki. This allows them to add to and change class resources easily. Students may upload course notes for each lecture up to the wiki (and therefore collaborate on the class notes). Students will also use netvibes to track their twitter feeds, wiki changes, diigo bookmarks, and youtube videos for class communication and research. Student group projects will include creating and maintaining a wiki and a youtube video.

On the content side:
I've changed the course to connect the disciplines of ecclesiology, missiology, postcolonial studies, and race/ethnic studies. In the class, student groups will reflect on the historical and contemporary church experience for particular ethnic groups in the US or overseas (along denominational or regional lines), and create group wikis and youtube videos that explore how the following postcolonial themes manifest in that particular tradition: diaspora, identity, race, cultural difference, hybridity, gender, sexuality, feminism, postmodernism, nationalism, globalization, and empire. Students will collect and analyze the stories of these communities and explore how we might be the "sent" people of God in the midst of these powers."

 http://www.ryanbolger.com/

 All this makes no sense to me at all!

 

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 July 2009 11:01
 
Hurting God PDF Print E-mail
Written by Calvin Fox   
Saturday, 09 May 2009 16:14
All the classic, historic doctrines, that I have believed and  preached and suffered for over 50 years are under attack these days by self-professed Evangelicals: The attributes of God; the Bible as the verbally inspired, inerrant, propositional Revelation or Word of God; the Cross of Jesus as a penal or substitutionary Atonement for sin; the lost, fallen condition of all human beings and the absolute necessity for personal regeneration; forensic justification by faith alone which includes the imputation for the righteousness of Christ to sinners; the absolute necessity for faith in the Atonement; the content of the Gospel and the definition of the Kingdom- very sadly, the list goes on.  
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Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 July 2009 11:02
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Thoughts in a Drug Store and Universalism PDF Print E-mail
Written by Calvin Fox   
Saturday, 09 May 2009 16:08

I was in a local drugstore this week to get a prescription filled.  While waiting, I noticed I was the only White person in the busy place.  Working in the pharmacy was a staff of African Americans, Hispanics and Asians.  That describes the other customers, too.  This ethnic mix is a good thing (though it still strikes me as strange to be in the minority).  Working together as a Team, even while speaking different languages with the customers, the scene was actually enjoyable to watch.  Oh, that Society could work this way.   Oh, that the Church could be this way.  One day it will-

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 July 2009 11:02
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Visiting a Green House and Receiving Communion PDF Print E-mail
Written by Calvin Fox   
Saturday, 14 March 2009 08:31
My wife and I enjoy visiting the Green House this time of year at a local college.  We went yesterday.  It takes time to walk slowly through and enjoy all the flowers and plants.  Yesterday the building also filled also with lots of little children and Senior Citizens being taken on a day trip.  That spoiled my enjoyment.  They are as entitled to visit as much as I am, of course; but their focus was not the same.  The children were just having noisy fun and needed contantly corraling by harried Staff and the Elders needed constantly help moving and getting around corners or doing stairs.  The kids were on the run while the Seniors were struggling along the very crowded aisles with their walkers  and wheel chairs.  We left and returned later in the day when there were no groups on day trips present.  

We take flowers and plants seriously, enjoying their variegated shapes and colors, trying to learn more about old favorites and to discover new ones.  For us, that requires respectful contemplation  and keen, undistracted observation.  It can be a very pleasant time. It made me think of the Eucharist.

There seems to be two main approaches to Holy Communion.  One focuses on the Wafer and Wine.  The benefits of Communion are conveyed simply by receiving them.  The Communicants are fed spiritual food in the form of  the Elements and all they must do is merely open their mouths.   It is a mechanical thing.  People go to the rail, receive and go back to their seat.  

The other approach focuses on the Communicants themselves.  Scripture is very clear.  To receive properly, Communicants must be baptized Believers who have examined their hearts and lives for sin prior to reception, making amends for any found.  When they receive they must do so in a worthy manner, recognizing what the wafer and wine represent.  They are to open their mouths to receive the elements, yes, but if they are to benefit they must "feed on them in their hearts by faith and with thanksgiving" for what Christ has done for them at Calvary.  

In other words, receiving Communion is a very personal, intentional, informed contemplative experience, much like what we think visiting a Green House should be.  The focus is far more on looking at the plants than on the plants being looked at. 
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The Importance of Expository Preaching PDF Print E-mail
Written by Calvin Fox   
Friday, 06 February 2009 10:41
Episcopalians probably hear more Scripture read on a regular basis in their Worship Services then most evangelical churches of every other type,  Usually they hear lengthy sections from the Old and New Testaments, the Psalms and a portion from one of the Gospels- four passages of Scripture at every Service!  

How come, then, Episcopalians are not known as Bible Christians or people who "know their Bibles"?  One good reason (of several) comes to mind- for the Scripture to really be a means of Grace, helpful in building up faith and in living the Christian life, shaping beliefs, values, morals and behavior, Scripture needs to be explained and applied.  That requires sermons which effectively do just that.  Such sermons are neither desired nor appreciated by many (most?) Episcopalians.  Much reading of the the Bible in Church is not enough.  It must also be effectively preached, week after week!  I applaud those Priests who do just that.  You will have your critics, but you will also have positive results in the lives of people you serve this way and a reward in Heaven.

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 03 March 2009 15:30
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