Home
Worship


COMPETELY REVISED: Eucharistic Worship PDF Print E-mail
Written by Calvin Fox   
Saturday, 04 April 2009 19:28

In the middle of what was the Jewish Passover Meal with his disciples, the Lord commanded a certain Ceremony. This would come to be known as the “Eucharist”.  We read Jesus took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to them, saying, "This is my body, which is given for you. Do this in remembrance of me." -Luke 22:18-20

Paul describes the scene this way, when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, "This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me." In the same way also he took the cup, after supper, saying, "This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me." -1 Cor 11:23-25

Three questions pop up here: What is meant by “do this”?  Who is to do this?  And what does “in remembrance of me”  mean?

Share
Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 July 2009 11:03
Read more...
 
Heavenly Worship PDF Print E-mail
Written by Calvin Fox   
Monday, 17 November 2008 12:20

Worship is happening in Heaven 24/7 and on Sundays, as we kneel before the Altar at church, we can participate in that Worship. This is the ideal, anyway.  And yesterday, it was my experience (or at least I had a little bit of it)  We were able to kneel directly in front of the Table.  That helped me to focus (we usually end up at the far end of the rail).  And there were no small and squirming children to distract me either, so I was able to concentrate.

4 … I looked, [in my spirit while kneeling] and there in heaven a door stood open! And the first voice, which I had heard speaking to me like a trumpet, said, ‘Come up here, and I will show you what must take place after this.’

Many Dispensationalists believe Rev 4:4 describes the future Rapture.  I believe it describes worship as it is in heaven now and what is supposed to happen in our worship on earth now.  God invites us to enter His heavenly presence.  He does not come down- we go up.  We do that “in the spirit”.  This is why concentration, focusing, is so essential.  We can ascend in our spirit into the heavenlies, even as we kneel at the Communion railing in our churches.  This is what happens-

Share
Last Updated on Thursday, 20 November 2008 19:57
Read more...
 
Communion: Received, not taken PDF Print E-mail
Written by Calvin Fox   
Thursday, 13 November 2008 10:11
I have taken Communion all my life.  My study of the New Testament more than 40 years ago convinced me that the Lord’s Supper should be a part of every Worship Service.  I was a Baptist Pastor at the time and we kept the “Ordinance” once a month.  The desire to follow the model of the early Church eventually led me to enter the Ministry of the “Christian Church” (churches of Christ).  I left that Denomination many years ago, but the desire for weekly Communion is the main reason I now worship in an Episcopal Church parish.  I still believe the Bible teaches that the Lord’s Supper should be at the center of every Worship Service.  Episcopalians “celebrate the Eucharist” at every Worship Service, but I no longer take Communion.

Recently, I had an insight into the difference between “receiving” Communion and “taking” Communion.  Many of us, especially men, have a hard time admitting need and difficulty with receiving help from others.  I do.   When I need something I go for it.  I take it (appropriately, of course).  Grace, as with all gifts, is something offered and given to us to be received not taken.   James Bond says of his martinis, “Shaken, not stirred”.  We Christian men, especially, need to say of God’s Grace “received not taken”.  That applies to Holy Communion.  God wants to freely give His grace and help and “food” to us.  Ours is simply to admit our need and receive it.  Kneeling at a Communion Rail with hands extended and open, palms up, helps us to do that.  Grace is not to be demanded or taken.  It is to be thankfully, humbly received.  The Celebrant places the Bread into our hands or  mouths and we, chewing, feed on the Lord in our hearts by faith with thanksgiving.  

Share
 
Why I believe in Liturgical Worship PDF Print E-mail
Written by Calvin Fox   
Thursday, 07 August 2008 14:08

I could simply say I enjoy its order, which is quiet and dignified. The Service has a definite beginning, middle and end.  There is a reverence and aesthetic beauty to it, usually enhanced and conveyed by the architecture, windows and furnishings of the Sanctuary (properly called a Nave).  The colorful robes and studied actions and rituals of the official participants (and of worshipers, too) also contribute to a sense of the Sacred. All of this seems appropriate to being in the presence of a Holy God and offering to Him sacrifices of praise and thanksgiving.  The instrumental and choral music is also appropriate for this and conducive to deep worship, prayer and communing with this Holy God.  Yes, I enjoy all of that.
 
I did not grow up with liturgical worship- far from it! Most of my meaningful experience in Worship has been in the free, simple Protestant style, in a casual and informal setting where the emphasis is on preaching and extemporaneous praying.  As a small child I attended a Methodist Church but later worshipped in Congregational and Baptist type churches.  I was almost 40 when I was introduced to Liturgical Worship.  During the last 30 years, even though I have worshiped (and have been a Pastor) in non-liturgical churches during part of this time, I have experienced a growing appreciation for Liturgical Worship.  This has been accompanied (and strengthened) by a growing unhappiness with worship trends in many evangelical churches.  But, is my appreciation of Liturgical Worship only a matter of personal preference and needs?  Are there good Scriptural and Theological reasons for Liturgical Worship.  Can it be defended and supported on ground more solid than personal temperament or “what works for me“?  It should be and can be!
 

Share
Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 September 2008 15:58
Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 Next > End >>

Page 5 of 5